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Fascenario 0.6 Road Bike Frameset - 2014 Black, 57cm

It's been voted the 'Best Bike of the World,' and it's even won the 2011 iF Product Design Award. Yes, we're talking about the Storck Fascenario 0. 6 Road Bike Frame. Simply put, the 0. 6 is the full-demonstration of Storck's capabilities. It's constructed using Storck's finest carbon fiber, its most complex proprietary manufacturing process, Power SL crankarms, integrated brakes, and Storck's most sophisticated fork design to date. Collectively, it becomes undeniable that the Fascenario 0. 6 is truly the total package. Starting with the carbon fiber itself, the Fascenario 0. 6 was constructed from Storck's own uni-directional carbon fiber. Why uni-directional? Well, compared to a woven carbon fabric, uni-directional carbon is oriented as it sounds, with one direction, or on one axis. And while this makes the production process incredibly complex in regards to both load path and force direction determination, the payout is worth it to Storck. You see, compared to woven layups, uni-directional fibers tend to better stiffen frames, while also improving vibration dampening. And, this is achieved at a much lower overall weight. However, Storck was far from finished in any of these regards. Let's approach the Storck layup process in a short series of steps. First off, Storck begins the design with 3D CAD imaging. This digital process provides Storck with the precise data and dimensions necessary for the development of the mold. From there, the CFR/UD fibers are soaked in resin and hand-placed into the computer-generated mold. Once placed in the mold, the fibers are heated and pressed into place with an air channeling tool. Afterwards, the fibers are smoothed over by hand, ensuring an unprecedented level of preciseness and detail to the layup. To add even more rigidity to the frame, Storck wrapped the molded uni-directional fibers with its proprietary woven carbon fibers. Essentially, these differ from uni-direction in that the fibers are oriented on two or more axe...

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Competitive Cyclist
$6,699.99 See It
Fascenario 0.6 Road Bike Frameset - 2014 Black, 55cm

It's been voted the 'Best Bike of the World,' and it's even won the 2011 iF Product Design Award. Yes, we're talking about the Storck Fascenario 0. 6 Road Bike Frame. Simply put, the 0. 6 is the full-demonstration of Storck's capabilities. It's constructed using Storck's finest carbon fiber, its most complex proprietary manufacturing process, Power SL crankarms, integrated brakes, and Storck's most sophisticated fork design to date. Collectively, it becomes undeniable that the Fascenario 0. 6 is truly the total package. Starting with the carbon fiber itself, the Fascenario 0. 6 was constructed from Storck's own uni-directional carbon fiber. Why uni-directional? Well, compared to a woven carbon fabric, uni-directional carbon is oriented as it sounds, with one direction, or on one axis. And while this makes the production process incredibly complex in regards to both load path and force direction determination, the payout is worth it to Storck. You see, compared to woven layups, uni-directional fibers tend to better stiffen frames, while also improving vibration dampening. And, this is achieved at a much lower overall weight. However, Storck was far from finished in any of these regards. Let's approach the Storck layup process in a short series of steps. First off, Storck begins the design with 3D CAD imaging. This digital process provides Storck with the precise data and dimensions necessary for the development of the mold. From there, the CFR/UD fibers are soaked in resin and hand-placed into the computer-generated mold. Once placed in the mold, the fibers are heated and pressed into place with an air channeling tool. Afterwards, the fibers are smoothed over by hand, ensuring an unprecedented level of preciseness and detail to the layup. To add even more rigidity to the frame, Storck wrapped the molded uni-directional fibers with its proprietary woven carbon fibers. Essentially, these differ from uni-direction in that the fibers are oriented on two or more axe...

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Competitive Cyclist
$6,699.99 See It
Aernario Road Bike Frameset - 2015 White/Black, 59cm

Storck designed the Aernario Road Bike Frame with one principle in mind -- balance. Basically, Markus Storck strove to seamlessly mate the aerodynamic frame design of its Aero time trial bikes with the rigidity, handling, and comfort of its Fascenario 0. 7. We would say that he succeeded. If you're familiar with 'aero-frames,' you probably don't own one, because you either loathe the aesthetic or find that watts that you save in drag reduction are tacked back on by poor power transfer and handling. To alleviate this problematic syndrome, Storck created what it calls 'sectional aerodynamic shaping.' However, it helps to think of this as an aerodynamic profile on the horizontal plane. By this, we mean that the Aernario's teardrop profile (NACA if you're savvy) takes shape horizontally rather than vertically. So, when viewing the frame from the side, it looks like a traditional road frame. However, if you were to take a cross-section, its aero-shape would become strikingly evident. In addition to the tube profile, Storck also improved aerodynamics and comfort by cleverly hiding the seatpost bolt under the top tube. By doing this, the tube shape is further streamlined, while shortening the seatpost increases comfort. Accordingly, the Aernario sees nothing but gains on all fronts. As for the carbon fiber, itself, the Aernario was constructed from Storck's own CFR/UD carbon fiber, with the UD designating 'uni-directional.' Why uni-directional? Well, compared to a woven carbon fabric, uni-directional carbon is oriented as it sounds, with one direction, or on one axis. And while this makes the production process incredibly more complicated in regards to load path and force direction determination, the payout is worth it to Storck. You see, compared to woven layups, uni-directional fibers tend to better stiffen frames, while also improving the characteristic of vibration dampening. And incredibly, this is achieved at a much lower overall weight. However, Storck was far ...

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Competitive Cyclist
$4,599.00 See It
Mens CTS 1000 19" Road Racing Bike - Graphite Blue

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Find bikes and cycles at Target.com! Enjoy exceptional biking experience with the forge cts 1000 road racing bike. It has shimano sora 24-speed front and 2200 rear derailleurs with integrated brake and shift levers. The 24-speed road bike has

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Target
$449.99 See It
GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike-2015 Carbon/Fluo, L

The '90s and early 2000s are widely considered to be a "different era" in road racing. We're referring of course to the uncompromising geometries that pros insisted on: short frame, long stem, low stack. Times are changing though, and Wilier's GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike is one of the best examples of new trends in pro-level geometry. Ten years ago, a geometry like this would be considered a sportive bike, but now it's showing up more and more in the European peloton at the most demanding races like Flanders and Roubaix. That's because the GTS is built like a race bike with a more upright position, more vibration absorbing compliance, and a slightly longer wheelbase. When compared to the Cento1SR that UnitedHealthcare rides, the GTS has a head tube that's just over a centimeter taller and half a degree slacker. Many Pro Tour outfits are now using bikes like this to tackle the cobblestones of the spring classics, so you can rest assured that the modifications to geometry do produce a more comfortable ride, but don't come with any performance penalties. New for 2015, the GTS is now offered as a disc brake-compatible frame, putting it ahead of the curve in another way. It's already equipped with disc brakes, which aren't officially legal in the peloton yet, despite being billed as the likely form of stopping going forward. Apart from a stiffer fork design, a slightly lower claimed weight (about 500 grams lighter), and better overall power transfer, the GTS remains largely unchanged from 2014. The frame is made from a blend of the same MR60H and T700SC carbon fiber found in the pro-level Cento1SR and superbike king Zero. 7, but the GTS also incorporates a lower modulus, HS40 carbon for extra comfort. It also has more aggressively shaped tubes that net a stable, confidence-inspiring ride, and elements like the head tube and fork use continual pieces of carbon fiber that wrap through and around joints to improve torsional stiffness without adding undue w...

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Competitive Cyclist
$2,899.00 See It
Marvel Ultegra Complete Road Bike - 2015 Black/Red, 59.5cm

Pinarello has always been a revered Italian cycling brand, but it's been in the last decade that the company's success in the grand tours has earned it enormous attention, and thus, business. Now in command of far larger R&D budgets, Pinarello has been able to afford to create less expensive, more everyday machines for the masses without compromising the famous handling or ride quality for which its premium machines are known. Case in point: The Pinarello Marvel, a little brother of the celebrated Prince, which is itself a little brother of the Dogma, a frame that is subject to much affection by the pros. The Pinarello Marvel Ultegra Complete bike takes the Marvel frameset and dresses it in race-ready parts and a Shimano Ultegra drivetrain, creating a machine that anyone can, and will, very much enjoy. Now, let's explain that Dogma-Prince-Marvel lineage a little better. Most important to understand is that all three frames come out of the same carbon molds, and all three use an identical construction method, wherein a dissolvable poly foam is used to smoothly and precisely form the inner walls of the frame, eliminating structural consistency issues associated with using inflatable bladders for the same purpose. The Marvel uses the same Onda (Latin for "wave") seatstay and fork design from its more expensive siblings to smooth out the road. The frame also utilizes the same asymmetrical frame design the two more senior members of its family use, capitalizing on the crank's drive-side cranking forces by aligning various elements of the frame -- some you can see, some you can't -- from the rear triangle to the headtube in such a way that they harness this imbalance to its benefit. The result is a dramatically stiffer, more responsive bike when pedaling hard, and it's something you'll not want to do without once you've gotten used to it. Digging deeper, though, we see that the material used in said molds is just as important, and Pinarello focuses here as well. So...

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Competitive Cyclist
$3,850.00 See It
Razha Shimano 105 Complete Road Bike - 2015 White/Black, 51.5cm

The bikes you see the pros rolling around on are pretty incredible, indeed, but they're also pretty unattainable, being several orders of magnitude more expensive than the vast majority of us can afford. Luckily, Pinarello is on your side. It knows you might not be able to afford it's top-dog Dogma or new F8 framesets, so it trickles down the technology employed in stunners like those and crafts machines like the 2015 Pinarello Razha 105 Complete Road Bike you see here. Carrying over many of the same features found within its flagship road bikes, the Razha was designed more for racers and cyclists who aren't necessarily pedaling a bicycle for a paycheck, yet who still appreciate the way a great bike performs. To start, the bike wears much of the asymmetrical shaping of its Dogma big brother. The tube shapes found on the Razha are strikingly similar, seeing as the research and development that went into creating the first and second edition Dogmas produced outstanding real-world race results. With this much attention to the asymmetrical design aspects of the Razha, you could easily overlook it from a distance. Only when you're close enough to touch it will you really be able to discern the subtle differences. The left and right sides of the bike bear different tube shapes, as well as general section sizes. You're able to see these differences in the top tube, the fork legs, and in both the seatstays and chainstays. During the two years in which the original Dogma sat atop the Pinarello family of frames, Pinarello studied and restudied the forces in action as a rider sprints on the pedals, pulls on the handlebars, and muscles the bike through corners. FEA (finite element analysis) confirmed that the Dogma's asymmetrical design was beneficial in leveling the variances in frame deflection from one side to the other. In addition to this, Pinarello addressed another area for potential improvement with the second iteration of the Dogma, which has also trickled into t...

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Competitive Cyclist
$2,550.00 See It
GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike-2015 Carbon/Fluo, M

The '90s and early 2000s are widely considered to be a "different era" in road racing. We're referring of course to the uncompromising geometries that pros insisted on: short frame, long stem, low stack. Times are changing though, and Wilier's GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike is one of the best examples of new trends in pro-level geometry. Ten years ago, a geometry like this would be considered a sportive bike, but now it's showing up more and more in the European peloton at the most demanding races like Flanders and Roubaix. That's because the GTS is built like a race bike with a more upright position, more vibration absorbing compliance, and a slightly longer wheelbase. When compared to the Cento1SR that UnitedHealthcare rides, the GTS has a head tube that's just over a centimeter taller and half a degree slacker. Many Pro Tour outfits are now using bikes like this to tackle the cobblestones of the spring classics, so you can rest assured that the modifications to geometry do produce a more comfortable ride, but don't come with any performance penalties. New for 2015, the GTS is now offered as a disc brake-compatible frame, putting it ahead of the curve in another way. It's already equipped with disc brakes, which aren't officially legal in the peloton yet, despite being billed as the likely form of stopping going forward. Apart from a stiffer fork design, a slightly lower claimed weight (about 500 grams lighter), and better overall power transfer, the GTS remains largely unchanged from 2014. The frame is made from a blend of the same MR60H and T700SC carbon fiber found in the pro-level Cento1SR and superbike king Zero. 7, but the GTS also incorporates a lower modulus, HS40 carbon for extra comfort. It also has more aggressively shaped tubes that net a stable, confidence-inspiring ride, and elements like the head tube and fork use continual pieces of carbon fiber that wrap through and around joints to improve torsional stiffness without adding undue w...

more >>
Competitive Cyclist
$2,899.00 See It
GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike-2015

The '90s and early 2000s are widely considered to be a "different era" in road racing. We're referring of course to the uncompromising geometries that pros insisted on: short frame, long stem, low stack. Times are changing though, and Wilier's GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike is one of the best examples of new trends in pro-level geometry. Ten years ago, a geometry like this would be considered a sportive bike, but now it's showing up more and more in the European peloton at the most demanding races like Flanders and Roubaix. That's because the GTS is built like a race bike with a more upright position, more vibration absorbing compliance, and a slightly longer wheelbase. When compared to the Cento1SR that UnitedHealthcare rides, the GTS has a head tube that's just over a centimeter taller and half a degree slacker. Many Pro Tour outfits are now using bikes like this to tackle the cobblestones of the spring classics, so you can rest assured that the modifications to geometry do produce a more comfortable ride, but don't come with any performance penalties. New for 2015, the GTS is now offered as a disc brake-compatible frame, putting it ahead of the curve in another way. It's already equipped with disc brakes, which aren't officially legal in the peloton yet, despite being billed as the likely form of stopping going forward. Apart from a stiffer fork design, a slightly lower claimed weight (about 500 grams lighter), and better overall power transfer, the GTS remains largely unchanged from 2014. The frame is made from a blend of the same MR60H and T700SC carbon fiber found in the pro-level Cento1SR and superbike king Zero. 7, but the GTS also incorporates a lower modulus, HS40 carbon for extra comfort. It also has more aggressively shaped tubes that net a stable, confidence-inspiring ride, and elements like the head tube and fork use continual pieces of carbon fiber that wrap through and around joints to improve torsional stiffness without adding undue w...

more >>
Competitive Cyclist
$2,899.00 See It
GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike-2015 Carbon/Fluo, S

The '90s and early 2000s are widely considered to be a "different era" in road racing. We're referring of course to the uncompromising geometries that pros insisted on: short frame, long stem, low stack. Times are changing though, and Wilier's GTS Ultegra 6800 Disc Complete Road Bike is one of the best examples of new trends in pro-level geometry. Ten years ago, a geometry like this would be considered a sportive bike, but now it's showing up more and more in the European peloton at the most demanding races like Flanders and Roubaix. That's because the GTS is built like a race bike with a more upright position, more vibration absorbing compliance, and a slightly longer wheelbase. When compared to the Cento1SR that UnitedHealthcare rides, the GTS has a head tube that's just over a centimeter taller and half a degree slacker. Many Pro Tour outfits are now using bikes like this to tackle the cobblestones of the spring classics, so you can rest assured that the modifications to geometry do produce a more comfortable ride, but don't come with any performance penalties. New for 2015, the GTS is now offered as a disc brake-compatible frame, putting it ahead of the curve in another way. It's already equipped with disc brakes, which aren't officially legal in the peloton yet, despite being billed as the likely form of stopping going forward. Apart from a stiffer fork design, a slightly lower claimed weight (about 500 grams lighter), and better overall power transfer, the GTS remains largely unchanged from 2014. The frame is made from a blend of the same MR60H and T700SC carbon fiber found in the pro-level Cento1SR and superbike king Zero. 7, but the GTS also incorporates a lower modulus, HS40 carbon for extra comfort. It also has more aggressively shaped tubes that net a stable, confidence-inspiring ride, and elements like the head tube and fork use continual pieces of carbon fiber that wrap through and around joints to improve torsional stiffness without adding undue w...

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Competitive Cyclist
$2,899.00 See It
Takara Men s Sugiyama 700c Road Bike - Black/Blue

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Find bikes and cycles at Target.com! The takara sugiyama mens road bike is sleek, stylish and lightweight. It has 1 gear with a steel frame that withstands rugged use, while the height-adjustable vinyl seat offers comfort. It has a front and a rear

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Target
$184.99 See It
GMC Men s Denali 700c Road Bike Black/Green

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Find bikes and cycles at Target.com! This denali men's road bike in a striking black-and-green color is great for serious bikers. With a steel frame, chain and pedals this road bike has shimano components, 700c tires and alloy side pull brakes.

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Target
$249.99 See It
Giordano Women s Libero 24 Road Bike Pink

Find bikes and cycles at Target.com! This stunning giordano libero road bike in pink (24"), italian-inspired road bike packs a powerful punch without breaking the bank. This women's bike features a handcrafted, lightweight 6061 aluminum frame, a 16-

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Target
$549.99 See It
GMC Denali Road Bike Gold 19" -30%

Find bikes and cycles at Target.com! You'll look stylish as you speed down the road on this gold bike by gmc. The frame is made of sturdy aluminum, which ensures durability. The pneumatic 700c tires feature metal alloy rims and help ensure a smooth

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Target
$229.99 $159.99 See It
Bicycle Parts & Accessories Electro Road Bike Bell 420270

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Shop for Outdoors at The Home Depot. The Electro road bike bell is a great option for bikes that want the safety and convenience of a bell, but without the look. The loud 100 dB bell can be mounted without any tools and is suitable for 22.2 mm

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Home Depot
$17.96 See It
Bike Handlebar Road Stash Bag - Black

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Find bicycle accessories at Target.com! Bell bike handlebar road stash bag - black

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Target
$9.18 See It
Bicycle Parts & Accessories 9/16 in. Alloy/CrMo Look Style Racing Bicycle Pedal 313471

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Shop for Outdoors at The Home Depot. The Tour de France Alloy Racing Clip less Pedals are the final ingredients to make you road bike a race bike. Intended for Look Keo Cleats. Upgrade your bike with Tour de France pedals. From the most legendary

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Home Depot
$54.97 See It
Bicycle Parts & Accessories 9/16 in. Alloy/CrMo Shimano Style Racing Bicycle Pedal 313470

Free Shipping on Over 500K Items!

Shop for Outdoors at The Home Depot. The Tour de France Alloy Racing Clip less Pedals are the final ingredients to make you road bike a race bike. Intended for Shimano Cleats. Upgrade your bike with Tour de France pedals. From the most legendary

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Home Depot
$54.97 See It
Velo Safe Custom Road Bike Case One Color, One Size

We ordinarily ship complete bicycles in a cleverly designed heavy-duty cardboard box. The overall goal of our bike box is to protect the bike from both structural damage and cosmetic damage as it makes its way from our warehouse to you. History proves that our design is an excellent one. Except for instances where UPS is extraordinary in the mishandling of a box, bikes nearly always arrive in perfect condition. The downsides of our standard box are almost non-existent. If anything, its only drawback is the fact that its cardboard construction isn't good for years of usage. While cardboard has quite a good strength-to-weight ratio, it isn't a material that lends itself to repeated use. In other words, you'll probably want to retire one of our bike boxes after maybe two or three shipments. The loading and unloading and varied sorts of handling inherent to a cross-country UPS shipment tend to chew up cardboard. And in moments of self-reflection, we also wish we could ship a bike in a less disassembled state. As it stands now, re-assembling a bike from Competitive Cyclist is a relatively simple affair: Attach the bar to the stem (that's 4 bolts), insert the seatpost (that's 1 bolt), thread on your pedals, and put on your wheels. 5 bolts, 2 pedals, and 2 wheels: It's a pretty simple assembly. But sometimes holding a handlebar in place and threading in 4 stem faceplate bolts can be a finger-twisting exercise. In an ideal world you wouldn't tread so closely to potentially frustrating territory. With the Velo Safe Pro Series Custom Road bike case, we feel like we've tracked down the very best solution on the market. For starters, its shell is made from seemingly indestructible polyethylene (read: thick, bulletproof plastic). Unlike cardboard, the exterior of the Custom Road box won't puncture, get rounded off, or otherwise allow anything from the outside world get to the interior. It's seriously beefy stuff. Other details add to its durability: It has 4 commercial-grade...

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Backcountry.com
$550.00 See It
Zero.9 Ultegra 6800 Complete Road Bike-2015 Black/Fluo Red, L

In its official literature, Wilier compares the Zero. 9 Ultegra Complete Road Bike's frameset to the Cento1SR, but we also find an apt comparison between the Zero. 9 and the super-bike contender Zero. 7. We aren't only compelled to make this connection by the shared naming convention (though that does, admittedly, play a role), but also the general similarities in tube shaping and construction. But first, the main differences between the Zero. 9 and the more expensive Zero. 7 and CentoSR1 frames lie in the latter's weight and external cable routing. It actually weighs around 50 grams less than the CentoSR1 and a paltry 200 grams more than the Zero. 7. This is because it's laid-up of the same 60t Mitsubishi high-modulus carbon featured in its fellow frames, supplemented by the same manufacturing tricks used to make the Zero. 7 so light. As for external routing, many of us actually prefer it to the current trend of internal routing. Externally routed cables are easier to install and more serviceable to the everyday riders who wrench on their own bikes. The geometry is also different, but only slightly so. Compared to the Zero. 7, the Zero. 9 has a slightly shorter reach across the sizes with a shorter top tube, and less rake in the fork, recommending it for the tighter maneuvering required in disciplines like cyclocross or for a less draped-over-the-handlebars fit on the road. It also has a taller head tube than the breakaway-friendly Cento1SR, so you're shaped less like a bullet and more like a patient bomb. We say patient bomb because, though it's more comfortable over the long haul than Wilier's other top-end frames, the Zero. 9 is most certainly not a Gran Fondo design. It's more than willing to drop the hammer on cue, blowing a group apart with a few pedal strokes on the day's final climb. The Zero. 9 also benefits from Wilier's proprietary tube-shape tweaks, including the unmistakably asymmetrical chain and seatstays. These two sections of the frame are mo...

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Competitive Cyclist
$3,499.00 See It
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